A few days ago I came across one of my favorite movies, Back to the Future II, featuring Michael J. Fox, Christopher Lloyd and the coolest time-travelling DeLorean ever. The 1980s classic serendipitously depicts Marty McFly travelling to the far off future, year 2015. Now that we’ve reached that epoch, let’s compare Back to the Future’s predictions and 2015 actuality.


Almost three decades premature, the film wasn’t that far off the mark envisioning handheld tablets, interactive wall-mounted TVs, voice controlled devices, video filming drones, videophones, and hand-less video games. Of course, the sci-fi cliché of hover boards and flying cars still haven’t come to fruition, and the Jaws franchise ended after two more shark-sequels, not eighteen. The prediction that powerful business men would still be using fax machines or that everyone would eat dehydrated microwavable dinners was a tragic fail. A couple of other prophecies, like the Chicago Cubs winning this year’s World Series, and Marty McFly’s future-chic, self-tying Nike’s are still a possibility. (Famous shoe-designer Tinker Hatfield hinted at the prospect of releasing Nike MAG with ‘Power Laces’ by year’s end).

What are some other exciting technologies and trends we can anticipate in 2015?

Gartner expects to see an emergence of smart machines which will automate may aspects of decision-making. GE expects the Industrial Internet to replace Big Data and Forbes forecasts cheaper and more available 3D printing. Exciting stuff!


back_to_the_future_jaws All of us here at Apttus have a little piece of Doc or Marty McFly in us. We all strive to better ourselves, our teams, and our company. Nestled in the heart of Silicon Valley, working to pioneer technological innovation with other innovation elites, like Salesforce, DocuSign, and Jitterbit. I’d like to think of our little nook of companies as Hill Valley from the Back to the Future because a step inside is like a step into the future.

Seeing Apttus put technology and innovation into full force, I must agree that “life in the actual future is extraordinary.”


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